Songs

Battle of Waterloo

Battle of Waterloo
Spring comes to Kirrie, all the world's in bloom,
Winter is forgiven now, fooled by April's broom,
Kirrie, oh Kirrie, you were aye my hame
Till Napoleon's bloody cannon hit their aim,

For the cold returns in autumn
when the wind rakes the trees,
And the summer lies forgotten
In a cold bed of leaves,
As winter begins aye mind Boney,
It wasn't only you,
Who was broken on the field of Waterloo.


Jeanie oh Jeanie, I am surely done,
Stricken down in battle, at the mooth o Boney's guns,
Jeannie oh Jeannie, aye sae dear tae me,
Let me hold you in my mind afore I dee,

For the cold returns in autumn...

Surgeon oh surgeon, leave me wi my pain,
Save your knife for others, who will surely rise again,
Surgeon oh surgeon, leave my blood to pour,
Let it drain into the bitter clay once more,

For the cold returns in autumn...
Daughter oh daughter, listen dear tae me,
Never wed a sodger, or a widow you will be
Daughter oh daughter, curse your lad to die,
Ere he catches the recruiting sergeant's eye,

For the cold returns in autumn...

Boney oh Boney, war was aye your game,
Bloody field your table, cannon yours to aim,
Boney oh Boney, we aye lived the same,
Drilling laddies not to fear the muskets' flame,

For the cold returns in autumn...

Jim Malcolm is a Scottish folksinger/songwriter brought up on Perthshsire and Angus and steeped in traditional Scottish music. This song can be heard on several of his recordings.

"Boney" is a 19th-century nickname for Napoleon Bonaparte, who was defeated at the Battle of Waterloo. Some 190,000 fought there; 47,000 were killed or wounded. The melody is a traditional bagpipe tune, usually played as a march. In an interview in the Rochester City Newspaper, Jim says, "I once heard it slowed down, played as a lament... it simply cried out for words. ...It made me think about the men from Scotland who had gone to fight in the Napoleonic wars, and I chose to tell the story of a man from Kirriemuir, a small town near where my family lives, who, like Napoleon, was broken on the field of Waterloo." You can hear Jim's version at www.jimmalcolm.com/html/glenfarg_waterloo.m3u, or Jim himself in Felton and Berkeley next January.



Wondrous Love

Wondrous Love
2. And in the morning light, I will sing, I will sing,
And in the morning light I will sing,
And in the morning light and through the darkest night,
I'll sing the grateful prayer of my soul, of my soul,
I'll sing the grateful prayer of my soul.
3. And in my final days, may I sing, may I sing,
And in my final days, may I sing,
And in my final days, may I sing out and praise,
The wondrous love that showed me the way, the way,
The wondrous love that showed me the way.

The folknik song pages are lovingly produced by Kay Eskenazi, John Kelly, and Barbara Millikan. Kay Eskenazi produced the song pages for this issue.

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